Books & Literature — Wilton Library
137 Old Ridgefield Road Wilton, CT 06897 Tel: 203-762-3950

Books & Literature

Preparing for a book discussion? The Wilton Library offers these tips for doing research at the Library and on the Web.
You may want to see what the Wilton Library staff recommends – you’ll find great suggestions for your next book!
For information about a specific author or work, try searching the name on Google. If you’re looking for evaluation of a specific work, try adding the word “review” to your search.

General

  • Antiquarian, Rare, and Used Book Sites
  • Booksellers on the Web
  • BBC Arts: Books
    (http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/books/)
    A potpourri of links on writing, poetry and books: all about authors, learning to write, and literary fun and games.
  • Best Book Buys
    (http://www.bestbookbuys.com/)
    Compares prices for new and used books at a number of independent and chain online bookstores.
  • Book Bytes
    (http://marylaine.com/bookbyte/index.html)
    A collection of columns by reviewer Marylaine Block about great books, annotated bibliographies of books too good to put down, book dealers, and links to other review sources.
  • Book Sale Finder
    (http://www.booksalefinder.com/)
    The comprehensive resource for book lovers, collectors, and bargain-hunters looking for great books at great prices.
  • Booknotes.org
    (http://www.booknotes.org/)
    C-SPAN designed this web site as a companion to its author interview series. Read transcripts from previous BOOKNOTES programs, watch RealVideo clips of some interviews, listen to recent BOOKNOTES programs in their entirety in RealAudio, and find a schedule of upcoming programs.
  • Books and Book Collecting
    (http://www.trussel.com/f_books.htm)
    A resource for book collectors searching for rare, out of print books, or volumes to complete sets. This site provides links to over 20 sources for used book buying with one search form.
  • BookSpot
    (http://www.bookspot.com/)
    An extensive directory of book-related links. Subject headings include What to Read, Genre Corner, Where to Buy, Behind the Books, Winners, and more.
  • Cambridge History of English and American Literature
    (http://www.bartleby.com/cambridge/)
    The largest public reference work of literary criticism and history on the Internet. Originally published 1907-1921, the 18 volumes include 303 chapters and more than 11,000 pages, edited and written by a worldwide panel of 171 leading scholars and thinkers of the early 20th century.
  • Censored: Wielding the Red Pen
    (http://www.lib.virginia.edu/exhibits/censored/intro.html)
    Exhibit from the University of Virginia examines censorship throughout U.S. history. Choose a category from the drop-down menu.
  • The Internet Public Library Online Literary Criticism Collection
    (http://www.ipl.org/div/litcrit/)
    Annotated collection of critical and biographical websites about authors and their works that can be browsed by author, by title, or by nationality and literary period.
  • Literature Webliography
    (http://www.lib.lsu.edu/hum/lit/lit.html)
    Links to many literature sources from overviews of literary fields to newsgroups and online literary journals.
  • LitLinks
    (http://bcs.bedfordstmartins.com/litlinks/Pages/Main.aspx)
    With qualitative information about authors and works, links are organized alphabetically by author within five genres: fiction, essays, drama, poetry, and critical theory.
  • A Simple Book Repair Manual
    (http://www.dartmouth.edu/~preserve/repair/repairindex.htm)
    An extensive guide to book repair created by members of Preservation Services, Dartmouth College Library.
  • Today in Literature
    (http://www.todayinliterature.com/index.asp)
    Today in Literature features a new original biographical story each calendar day about the great writers, books, and events in literary history, supplemented with links to recommended websites where you will find author biographies, electronic texts, reviews, quotes and other reference materials of interest to avid readers, members of book clubs, students, and teachers.
  • Your Old Books
    (http://www.rbms.nd.edu/yob.html)
    This guide (produced under the auspices of the Rare Books and Manuscripts Section, Association of College and Research Libraries) covers some frequently asked questions about rare books and book values.

Discussion Groups

  • Book-Clubs.com
    (http://www.book-clubs.com)
    An “all-in-one-place” portal for finding information about particular book clubs as well as for finding book clubs that match your professional, leisure or other needs.
  • Book Movement
    (http://www.bookmovement.com/)
    Register your book club and get your own book club page, send out email reminders, and access discussion guides.
  • Book Group Request Form

Electronic Texts

  • Bartleby.com
    The preeminent Internet publisher of literature, reference, and verse.
  • Bibliomania
    (http://www.bibliomania.com/)
    Fully searchable full-text editions of classic works of fiction, non-fiction, drama, short stories, and poetry.
  • Classic Reader
    (http://www.classicreader.com/)
    Read classic works of literature, poetry, fiction, and more in cleanly-formatted HTML. Free (and simple) registration allows you to make your own annotations (visible only to you), participate in online discussions, and download HTML versions of entire books.
  • Digital Dante
    (http://dante.ilt.columbia.edu/)
    An extensive project started before the Web existed, Digital Dante is a great starting point for Dante neophytes and scholars. Here you will find background and critical information, easy-to-read full texts in original Tuscan and two of the most respected English translations.
  • Electronic Books
    (http://www.stockton.lib.ca.us/ebooks.htm)
    This resource from the Stockton San Joaquin Public Library points you to many places online where you can find electronic texts and the software that lets you access them.
  • Electronic Literature Directory
    (http://directory.eliterature.org/)
    A project seeking to provide access to some of the most innovative electronic texts on the Internet.
  • EServer.org
    (http://eserver.org/)
    Since 1990, the EServer has been “collecting” humanities texts from all over the Internet. There are currently over 32,000 items here covering all areas of the humanities.
  • Google Books
    (http://books.google.com/)
    Search the full text of books to find the perfect book for your purposes and discover new ones. If the book is out of copyright, or the publisher has given permission, you’ll be able to see a preview of the book, and in some cases the entire text.
  • Internet Archive Text Archive
    (http://www.archive.org/details/texts)
    Download free books and texts. The Internet Archive Text Archive contains a wide range of fiction, popular books, children’s books, historical texts and academic books.
  • LibriVox
    (http://librivox.org/)
    LibriVox volunteers record chapters of books in the public domain, and then we release the audio files back onto the net for free. All our audio is in the public domain, so you may use it for whatever purpose you wish.
  • Lit2Go
    (http://etc.usf.edu/lit2go/index.htm)
    A collection of children’s literature provided by the Educational Technology Clearinghouse, Lit2Go is a free online collection of stories and poems in Mp3 (audiobook) format.
  • Literature.org
    (http://www.literature.org/)
    A collection of literary classics available in full-text HTML.
  • Online Books Page
    (http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/)
    This extensive, searchable index of over 20,000 full-text English-language works also provides access to large repositories of specialty and foreign language works.
  • Project Gutenberg
    (http://www.gutenberg.org/)
    Possibly the largest single effort to convert literature into digital format and put it on the Internet, Project Gutenberg recently published its 13,000th e-text.
  • Wired for Books
    (http://www.wiredforbooks.org)
    This award-winning site offers a variety of original works of poetry, essays, short stories, children’s books, and scholarly discussions of books and literature.

Literary Journals

We are including here a sample of some of the best, both technologically and creatively. NEWPages.com lists and connects to many more.

  • Ploughshares
    Ploughshares is published three times a year at Emerson College. Each issue offers almost two hundred pages of great new stories and poems, guest-edited by a prominent writer who explores personal visions, aesthetics, and literary circles.

Reading Lists and Recommendations

  • AllReaders
    (http://www.allreaders.com/)
    Search for book recommendations by broad category or author, or by any combination of plot, theme, character or setting. Heavy on modern British fiction.
  • Banned Books Online
    (http://digital.library.upenn.edu/books/banned-books.html)
    This online exhibit of books that have been banned or censored for various reasons aims to raise awareness of censorship.
  • Fiction_L Booklists
    (http://www.webrary.org/rs/FLbklistmenu.html)
    Compiled by an online readers’ advisory discussion group in response to readers’ requests, this eclectic collection of reading lists should appeal to any avid reader.
  • Genrefluent
    (http://www.genrefluent.com/)
    This online companion to the popular reference for genre fiction will keep you up-to-date with the latest offerings in your favorite genre.
  • Great Books of Western Civilization
    (http://www.mercer.edu/gbk/index.html)
    Online home of an interdisciplinary course of study at Mercer University, this site provides course syllabi and links to online versions of the texts studied.
  • LibraryReads
    (http://libraryreads.org/)
    “The top ten books published this month that librarians across the country love.”
  • The Mystery Reader
    (http://www.themysteryreader.com/)
    For the true mystery fan, this page has hundreds of reviews, author information, and news about eagerly awaited new publications.
  • Novelist
    (http://search.epnet.com/cpidlogin.asp?profile=novelist&custid=s4408004)
    Book lists, reading recommendations, discussion guides, book reviews, author biographies and more. [Available to Wilton residents with current Wilton Library cards -- if you are a Wilton resident in need of a card, stop by the library or fill out this application.]
  • Overbooked
    (http://www.overbooked.com/)
    Includes recommended book lists in genre fiction, a discussion area, “hot lists” of forthcoming hardcover fiction releases, and lists of books that received at least one “starred” review in a major journal.
  • The Romance Reader
    (http://www.theromancereader.com/)
    At this starting point for readers of romance, you will find links to authors’ pages, reading groups, book reviews, publisher information, and award winners.
  • SF Site
    (http://www.sfsite.com/)
    This online magazine for fans of Science Fiction and Fantasy has reviews, author interviews, notes about conventions, and articles on related topics such as computer gaming and science fact that’s as exciting as fiction.
  • Stop, You’re Killing Me!
    (www.stopyourekillingme.com)
  • A resource for lovers of mystery, crime, thriller, spy, and suspense books, listing over 3,900 authors with chronological lists of their books (over 44,000 titles), both series (4,400+) and non-series.
  • What Do I Read Next?
    (http://sales.iacenter.com:1800/cgi-bin/iconn/rpa.pl)
    If you have read all of your favorite author, or if you’re just looking for something good to read, try searching this collection of more than 100,000 titles with summaries, reviews, subject classifications and more. After you have entered your barcode number, click on “What Do I Read Next?” in the list of databases. [Available to all Connecticut residents with current public library cards. If you are in need of a library card, please visit your home town library -- the Wilton Library cannot issue cards to non-Wilton residents.]
  • What’s Next?
    (http://ww2.kdl.org/libcat/WhatsNextNEW.asp)
    If you’re a mystery buff or science fiction fan, you probably have some favorite authors who write series, and favorite characters who appear in them. From Jane Marple to Jane Whitefield, What’s Next will update you on installments you might have missed.
  • Fiction Sites by Genre
    Further resources for fiction, selected by our own librarians.

Reviews and Awards

Writing

  • ShawGuides: Writer’s Conferences & Workshops
    (http://www.shawguides.com/)
    Find detailed descriptions of hundreds of conferences, workshops, residences, and retreats for writers worldwide.
  • Writer’s Digest
    (http://www.writersdigest.com/)
    A supplement to the printed edition of Writer’s Digest, this site contains the most current information on publishing both fiction and non-fiction.
  • Writer’s Guild of America West
    While you must have had many hours of original screenplays actually produced in order to qualify for membership, this site offers tips, tricks and links for the non-member interested in screenwriting. Try the Writer’s Guild of America East site, as well.